Food packaging

Aluminum demand affecting beverages and pet food packaging in NH

The demand for aluminum is impacting the food and beverage industry, including craft beer brewers. the containers of choice. “It’s great packaging, for beer, it helps the beer stay fresh and not get hit by light, so it’s no wonder we turned to packaging. It’s also very friendly to ship,” said Scott Thornton of Great Rhythm Brewing Company. Aluminum cans are becoming increasingly popular in the growing beverage industry. third-party vendors when some national vendors have increased purchase minimums to a point now out of reach. at the warehouse,” Thornton said. The demand for beer is on the rise, but meeting it can be difficult. Third-party vendors are helping, but can costs are now almost double pre-pandemic prices. When big can suppliers moved away from smaller craft beer companies, it increased production line costs. Large beverage manufacturers are much less affected. With their capital, they are able to forecast and place those orders well in advance and secure supply,” said Kevin Daigle, president of the New Hampshire Grocers Association. Competition is increasing, and not just in the beverage aisle – demand is up in the pet food aisle, with dog and cat adoptions on the rise. wasn’t really competitive in the aluminum market,” Daigle said. Brewers are trying to overcome the shortage for the time being. “Time will tell how long anyone can last without raising prices,” Thornton said.

The demand for aluminum is impacting the food and beverage industry, including craft beer brewers.

Some call the shortage a “can-demic”.

Great Rhythm Brewing Company has been serving New Hampshire consumers with craft beer since 2012 with aluminum kegs and cans, the containers of choice.

“It’s a great packaging, for beer, it helps the beer stay fresh and not get hit by light, so it’s no wonder we turned to the packaging. It’s also very friendly to ship,” said Scott Thornton of Great Rhythm Brewing Company.

Aluminum cans are becoming increasingly popular in the growing beverage industry.

Competition is up and supply down, especially with China cutting production.

Small businesses are turning to third-party vendors when some national vendors have raised purchase minimums to a point now out of reach.

“We’re obviously limited by how many we can fit, so things like that five-truck minimum limit in a space like Portsmouth is really difficult to store,” Thornton said.

The demand for beer is on the rise, but meeting it can be difficult. Third-party vendors are helping, but can costs are now almost double pre-pandemic prices.

When big can suppliers moved away from smaller craft beer companies, it increased production line costs. Large beverage manufacturers are much less affected.

With their capital, they are able to forecast and place those orders well in advance and secure supply,” said Kevin Daigle, president of the New Hampshire Grocers Association.

Competition is on the rise and not just in the beverage aisle – demand is up in the pet food aisle, with dog and cat adoptions surging.

“With that, you’ve now seen an increase in pet food production, which usually wasn’t really competitive in the aluminum market,” Daigle said.

Brewers are trying to overcome the shortage for the time being.

“Time will tell how long anyone can last without raising prices,” Thornton said.